Monday, 30 September 2013

CIBSE HQ: A Commercial Green Deal Story - Part 3 - DECs are the business

Digital Energy www.digitalenergy.org.uk have now completed the Green Deal assessment and produced the voluntary DEC certificates.

We do not currently have an option to apply for Green Deal funding as we are now being told that this will not be available until early 2014 according to Mark Bayley, Chief Executive of the Green Deal Finance Company.   We will be ready when it is! In the meantime we now have current voluntary DEC certificates with an Operational Rating (OR) of 80 and up to date associated Advisory Reports giving us a comprehensive set of Energy Certificates for the CIBSE HQ buildings. The advisory reports have their limitations and have been widely criticised www.gov.uk/government/publications/exploring-the-use-of-display-energy-certificates, but ours give us comprehensive advice on how to reduce our energy use by both improvements in our energy management and use of energy in the building, and fabric or system improvements.  Green Deal is just one funding method for the fabric and system improvements, but we can improve our management and encourage better user behaviour ourselves.  With the wealth of energy information to hand, perhaps a case can be made for funding from other sources.

Recommendation Reports (RR) with EPCs and Advisory Reports (AR) with DECs have been around for a few years now.  Green Deal Advice Reports (GDAR) are a more recent introduction.  We have not had the opportunity to compare an RR with an AR and with a GDAR, all for the same building and produced by the same individual, until now….

The limitation of the RR is that it only deals with asset improvements and does not address operational measures, whereas the GDAR and AR cover both.  The operational advice within the GDAR is very generic and bland (motherhood and apple pie” material and would have been read many times before in any energy management guidance produced directly or indirectly by Government Offices since the 1970s.  The objective of the Green Deal assessment is of course to facilitate funding for asset improvements so that probably explains the superficial treatment of operational advice.

The Advisory Report on the other hand provides asset and operational improvement advice that is more tailored to the specific building and goes into more detail in terms of the number of measures addressed.  A well prepared Advisory Report reads more like the result of a detailed survey by an engineer than the standard list of measures taken from a check list that you get from the other reports.

DECC are currently considering what mechanisms for energy audit and improvement advice already in use might be suitable for meeting the requirements of the energy audit requirements  of the Energy Efficiency Directive.  On the evidence from the multiple reports on these two buildings, the DEC and Advisory Report seems to be strong candidates if the concerns noted in the recent DECC survey are addressed. Indeed CIBSE contributed to a comprehensive set of recommendations for improving the advisory report and the wider DECC process in a review of the potential benefits of a wider roll out of DECs published by the UKGBC in March 2011 www.ukgbc.org/resources/publication/uk-gbc-task-group-report-carbon-reduction-existing-non-domestic-buildings

All that is needed is for DCLG to act on this. It would enhance the value of the advisory report at little cost – something that this government keeps telling us it is trying to do as part of its policy of better regulation and reducing red tape. When so many people can see the scope to improve the DEC advisory report, it is frustrating that DCLG do not seem to be listening!



DELTA HOUSE


Recommendation Report  from EPC (In ranking order)
Green Deal Advice Report (In ranking order)
Advisory Report

Asset Measures
Lighting improvements
Internal insulation of (external) walls
Consider introducing or improving loft insulation

Glazing improvements
DHW storage cylinder insulation
Consider how building fabric air tightness could be improved, for example sealing, draught stripping and closing off unused ventilation openings, chimneys etc.

PV
Lighting improvements
If stratification occurs consider re-circulating the air during heating

Solar Water Heating
PV
Engage experts to survey the condition of the HWS systems and propose remedial and upgrading works to improve condition and operating efficiency

Identify and treat air leakage
Solar Water Heating
Consider applying reflective coating  to windows and/or fit shading devices to reduce unwanted solar gain

DHW storage cylinder insulation

Engage experts to review the building lighting strategies and propose alterations and/or upgrades to daylighting provisions, luminaires and their control systems and an implementation plan


Consider installing building mounted photovoltaic electricity generating panels


Consider installing building mounted solar ware heating






Lifestyle/Energy Manage-ment Measures

Allocated Energy Manager
Implement a programme to read, record and analyse the electricity and heat sub-meters in the building


Monitoring and Targeting Programme
Engage experts to review heating system controls to ensure heating is only operational when required. During the assessment some of the heat emitters were found to be warm when external temperatures indicated that no heating was required.


Management of HVAC controls



Good Practices for lighting use



Staff awareness and training



HAVAC checks by energy manager



Monitoring and servicing of HVAC plant and lighting



BUILDING SERVICES CENTRE
Recommendation Report from EPC (in ranking order)
Green Deal Advice Report (in ranking order)
Advisory Report
Solar Control to windows

Loft insulation
Consider introducing or improving loft insulation
Lighting improvements
Glazing improvements
Consider how building fabric air tightness could be improved, for example sealing, draught stripping and closing off unused ventilation openings, chimneys etc.
Glazing improvements
Lighting improvements
Consider adjusting existing, or installing new automatic external door closers or adopting revolving door solutions
Solar Water Heating
Replace DHW storage system with electric point of use in kitchen
Consider engaging experts to review the condition of the building fabric and propose measures to improve energy performance.  This might include building pressure tests for air tightness and thermography tests for insulation continuity.
PV
PV
Consider applying reflective coating to windows and/or fit shading devices to reduce unwanted solar gain.
Identify and treat air leakage
Solar Water Heating
Engage experts to propose specific measures to reduce hot water wastage and plan to carry this out.
Consider replacing kitchen DHW storage system with point of use units
Consider installing building mounted solar water heating
Replace DHW storage system with electric point of use in kitchen

Consider improving or replacing glazing.
Consider installing building mounted photovoltaic electricity generating panels
Review HVAC control settings/timings


Engage experts to review the building lighting strategies and propose alterations and/or upgrades to daylighting provisions, luminaires and their control systems and an implementation plan


Consider fitting push taps for the toilet hand washing facilities

Allocated Energy Manager
Implement a programme to read, record and analyse the electricity and heat sub-meters in the building

Monitoring and Targeting Programme
Review HVAC controls for Council Chamber to improve performance and match usage of system to occupancy.

Management of HVAC controls


Good Practices for lighting use


Staff awareness and training


HAVAC checks by energy manager


Monitoring and servicing of HVAC plant and lighting




Friday, 23 August 2013

CIBSE HQ: A Commercial Green Deal Story - Part 2

Still inspired by @SophiePelsmakers “My Green Deal Journey” here is the second instalment of the commercial Green Deal story on the CIBSE buildings.  

Due to non-availability of personnel a second visit by the Green Deal Advisor was required to complete all of the “lifestyle” questions.  This is something that both advisors and clients are going to have to try and manage better going forward.

However, we now have our two Energy Performance Certificates (EPC) and Green Deal Advice Reports, one of each for each building.

The first interesting thing is that despite the age difference and the differences in construction, their ratings were similar.  For the newer Building Services Centre the EPC was a D (81 Asset Rating) and the Victorian Delta House was also a D (88 Asset Rating). This demonstrates that it is possible to retro-fit older buildings to bring them up to a modern standard. However in both cases the EPC states that if they were newly built, both buildings would be B rated (in the thirties.)

In 2002, CIBSE began an energy performance makeover on the buildings as part of the Carbon 60 project, setting a target to reduce carbon emissions by 60%, and the success of that initiative is apparent in the similar ratings.  Details of the Carbon 60 project can be found at: www.cibse.org/content/cibsesymposium2011/Paper119.pdf 

The Green Deal initiative could be regarded as the next step in an on-going process of reducing carbon emissions.

The EPCs came with a recommendations report which is purely based on measures to improve the fixed assets of the building and the merits of the improvement are judged assuming standard occupancy. The Green Deal advice report also recommends fixed asset improvements but the merits are judged on the actual use of the building. Additionally the Green Deal Advice Report recommends improvements in the way energy use is managed, i.e. the behaviour of the people in the building.


DELTA HOUSE
BUILDING SERVICES CENTRE

Recommendation Report  from EPC (In ranking order)
Green Deal Advice Report (In ranking order)
Recommendation Report from EPC (In ranking order)
Green Deal Advice Report (In ranking order)
Asset Measures
Lighting improvements
Internal insulation of (external) walls
Solar Control to windows

Loft insulation
Glazing improvements
DHW storage cylinder insulation
Lighting improvements
Glazing improvements
Photovoltaic
Lighting improvements
Glazing improvements
Lighting improvements
Solar Water Heating
Photovoltaic
Solar Water Heating
Replace DHW storage system with electric point of use in kitchen
Identify and treat air leakage
Solar Water Heating
Photovoltaic
Photovoltaic
DHW storage cylinder insulation

Identify and treat air leakage
Solar Water Heating


Replace DHW storage system with electric point of use in kitchen



Review HVAC control settings/timings


Lifestyle/Energy Management Measures

Allocated Energy Manager

Allocated Energy Manager

Monitoring and Targeting Programme

Monitoring and Targeting Programme

Management of HVAC controls

Management of HVAC controls

Good Practices for lighting use

Good Practices for lighting use

Staff awareness and training

Staff awareness and training

HAVAC checks by energy manager

HAVAC checks by energy manager

Monitoring and servicing of HVAC plant and lighting

Monitoring and servicing of HVAC plant and lighting

It is interesting and somewhat perplexing to note that the main differences are in the Management recommendations rather than the Asset improvements, given that the Green Deal is intended to fund difficult to fund Asset improvements.

For these buildings the situation might be a consequence of the Carbon 60 project with most asset improvements already in place.

The projected annual savings are summarised as follows:



DELTA HOUSE
BUILDING SERVICES CENTRE
Asset
£824 (£691 from top three measures)
£500 (£229 from top three measures)
Management
£938
£923

The asset savings are on a scale that is unlikely to meet the Golden Rule for Green Deal funding, although some individual measures might. That is for the Green Deal Provider to determine and is the next step.

In the meantime CIBSE can make even better savings by improving their management of the building.This may turn out to be the biggest benefit to organisations having Green Deal assessments on their buildings.  The law of unintended consequences sometimes produces a positive outcome.

So, the next steps are:
1.    Funding the top three asset improvements from our own resources or
2.  Approaching a Green Deal Provider to see what they can offer...